Newsletter Archives

Letter From the Editor: November 2020

Letter From the Editor

Introducing CPD Junkie Alerts

 

We are very excited with the growth of CPD Junkie. Each month, more and more dentists in Australia are finding and benefiting from what we have to offer and we take this responsibility very seriously. We are working away in the background to ensure that our directory is as 

comprehensive as it can be and that we can offer more value to our dental colleagues. This month we are really excited to announce CPD Junkie Alerts. To benefit from CPD Junkie Alerts, simply register as a user on the site, let us know what courses and topics you are interested in and we will let you know when they become available. Think custom tailored email alerts specifically for topics you are interested in. Never miss another course again. 

 

In this month’s newsletter, Dr. Geoff Hall of Ortho Ed has shared an orthodontic case with clear aligners. We hope you learn from it as much as we did and if you are interested in orthodontics, be sure to look up Ortho Ed courses on CPD Junkie!

Enjoy this month’s newsletter and let’s all aim for a strong finish to 2020!

The Team at CPD Junkie

Featured Article – November 2020

Case Study

How to achieve a better,
faster and more predictable
result with aligner
treatment planning

Geoff Hall Headshot

Dr. Geoff Hall Bio:

Dr Geoffrey Hall received his dental training at the University of Melbourne in 1983, and pursued his postgraduate orthodontic training at the prestigious University of Pennsylvania in 1990.

Dr Hall has an extreme passion for clinical orthodontics and orthodontic training for Dentists, specialising in adult and children treatments including early treatment, conventional adolescent therapy, short-term orthodontics (Smilefast) and cosmetic treatment options including lingual braces, Invisalign and other aligner systems, and a strong emphasis on interdisciplinary treatment, including orthognathic surgical cases.

Dr Hall has been a pioneer in modern day orthodontics and education and all backed by 27 years and over 10,000 cases of orthodontic experience.

In 2020 OrthoED has developed a Complete Aligner Treatment Planning Service (Caps) to help dentists provide optimal digital setups and allow them to treat even the most advanced of aligner cases. This service makes aligner therapy for the general dentist very predictable and profitable .This service supports Invisalign, SureSmile  aligners, Smilestyler and Angelalign.

Dr Hall is a member of many associations including the Australian Dental Association, Australian Society of Orthodontists, American Association of Orthodontists, and various Lingual Orthodontic Associations. He has 2 wonderful adult children and been blessed with a gorgeous grandson.

Traditional orthodontic thinking
would require a patient with severe
crowding and an open bite anteriorly
to be treated orthodontically
with fixed appliances/braces in
combination with dental extractions
and more than likely a surgical
approach as well.

Could aligner therapy alone (without extractions or surgery) resolve the issues of crowding and anterior open bite – quite possibly.

Ortho Case

Case: A 15-year-old female presents with a class 1 posterior relationship with significant crowding in her upper
and lower anterior region and a 7mm anterior open bite. What would you do?

From a facial perspective, the patient had a slightly retrognathic mandible. There was a dolichofacial and vertical growth pattern with a long lower facial height and demonstrated significant lip strain on closure.

Initial Digital Setup

The initial digital set up was returned and further attachments were placed, staging of treatment was modified significantly and most importantly over correction of the posterior segments was incorporated to provide the digital set up a posterior open bite. Here is the digital set up and final treatment plan for the first set of aligners.

We decided to treat the patient with Aligner Therapy. The results were extremely impressive:

Through excellent treatment planning – and with a final plan of 17 upper aligners and 15 lower aligners, the following treatment result was achieved – an excellent correction of the anterior open bite and now a further modification is required to perfect the anterior alignment and in particular the crown tip of the lower right lateral incisor and also requiring further improvement in providing a nice socked in occlusion posteriorly and adding further buccal root torque to the upper second molar teeth. In the past this type of patient – who presented with an anterior open bite and crowding – was traditionally treated with a combination of orthodontics and orthognathic surgery.and dental extractions to resolve the crowding issue. If left untreated, the patient would have significant functional problems as well as serious occlusal wear on the posterior teeth. She may also have issues with proper mastication;unable to chew and digest food properly. Not to mention the aesthetic and potential psychological issues she may suffer in her delicate teenage years and beyond as a result. However, there are a number of potential problems and challenges that many dentists face with aligner therapy, including:

• Poor case planning
• Incorrect stageing of the tooth movements
• Poor placement or use of incorrect attachments based on the biomechanical requirements
• Not providing the necessary over-corrections
• Offering an unrealistic treatment outcome; a common mistake aligner companies cause and general dentists experience frequently.

To perfect the result, a refinement is planned with a further 15 upper aligners and 10 lower aligners – making the treatment in total of 32 upper aligners and 25 lower aligners – and the patient has been changing each aligner weekly, so we expect a total treatment time to be less than nine months.

Digital Setup and Final Treatment Plan

Here is the digital set up and final treatment plan for the first set of refinement.
This case demonstrates the value of a good diagnosis, excellent treatment planning which factors in ideal staging of treatment, understanding the use and biomechanics of different attachments, when and how to over correct different tooth movements and
ensuring the set up provides predictable movements with aligners to allow a predictable outcome for your patients.

With the right team of orthodontists experienced in aligner therapy planning the treatment for you, these mistakes can be avoided and even the most difficult
cases can be managed and completed successfully with aligner therapy.

Like to learn more about how to provide high-quality orthodontic aligner treatments with predictable, profitable and positive outcomes every time?

Learn about CAPS, visit capsdental.com.au today.

Letter from the Editor – October 2020

Letter from the Editor October:Your Partner in CPD

We launched CPD Junkie at the start of 2020 with the goal of being the go to source for dentists looking to find CPD. Our aim was to create a comprehensive directory to help dentists browse, search and compare CPD in areas of interest. CPD made simple. We are proud of the our growing directory (now over 500 courses listed) and the tools and services that we are developing to help our colleagues find the CPD they are looking for. We are working with our partners to bring Junkie Deals exclusive to our members and have some exciting plans in the works for 2021. To our members, we will soon be delivering you email notifications for CPD events that you have indicated interest in. This customised and curated email will be tailor made to match your areas of interest – delivered to your inbox monthly. As we grow and bring on more partners from the CPD industry, we are focused on finding value and finding ways to help you take the guesswork out of CPD. Our monthly newsletter and the amazing resources such as the “How to get the most out of CPD” E-book and the CPD Junkie x Szabi Hant photography cheat sheet are also some of the perks we are proud to provide our members.

So we hope that you continue to check in often with CPD Junkie and trust us as your go to platform for finding CPD. If you enjoy the site and find value with what we are doing, it would be great if you could recommend us to your friends, colleagues and classmates.

Enjoy this weeks expert Q&A with Dr Aovana Timmerman!

Dr. Omid Azami

Co-Founder CPD Junkie

October Newsletter

Expert Q&A in Endodontics with Dr. Aovana Timmerman

Expert Q&A with: Dr. Aovana Timmerman

Dr. Timmerman

“Good communication with the patient is something that I find that most dentists struggle with. I would suggest building up rapport with senior clinicians at work, a mentor through an organisation or with the specialists that you refer to and ask them lots of questions on how they would communicate with their patients in different scenarios and learn from their experiences.”

Dr. Aovana Timmerman

Bio:

Aovana graduated with a Bachelor of Dental Science from the University of Melbourne in 2001 and after completing her fellowship with the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons (RACDS) in 2010, she continued with her specialist training obtaining a Doctor of Clinical Dentistry in Endodontics.

Aovana has been involved with endodontic education since 2011 and was awarded the Graduate Certificate in Clinical Teaching in 2019. Currently, Aovana is a clinical demonstrator for the Doctor of Dental Surgery Endodontic program at The University of Melbourne and examines dentists in the Membership (GDP) program for RACDS and Australian Dental Council. 

Aovana is currently working part-time in private practice at Collins Street Specialist Centre and is also pursuing her PhD part-time at the University of Melbourne and has published research in both local and international peer-reviewed journals.

Endodontics can be quite a stressful procedure for many dentists. What advice can you give around case selection and workflow so that dentists can confidently assess and choose cases which they will be able to complete confidently?

 

Case difficulty assessment can help general dentists decide if they would consider proceeding with endodontic treatment or consider referral. There is a useful form published online by the American Association of Endodontists which can be downloaded on this link – https://www.aae.org/specialty/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2019/02/19AAE_CaseDifficultyAssessmentForm.pdf.

I would suggest using the form until the clinician feels comfortable in assessing a case without using the form.

From my own experience as a general dentist, I definitely found it better to work on simpler cases at the start, before managing more challenging cases, as this approach helped me to build up my confidence and workflow as a clinician. 

In addition, I often encourage general dentists to discuss their cases with their endodontists if he/she is uncertain about managing a complex case. I found that when I was a general dentist, the patients really appreciated that I have discussed their cases with the specialists before making a referral. First of all, it gave the patients reassurance that they definitely need specialist care. Secondly, it helped me to gain a deeper understanding of the case such as potential complications and risks and helped me look into alternative treatment options in managing a complex case after discussing it with the endodontist.

With workflow, it definitely becomes easier with time once you have established the way you like to work, and every practice tends to have a slightly different set up with materials, equipment and staff support. If you have just joined a practice, I would suggest observing the experienced dentist(s) at the practice and note the workflow and see if you would make any changes that would suit your needs.

 

 

As an endodontist who also educates dentists, what are some of the key aspects of endodontic treatment that you find most dentists find challenging? How can they overcome these challenges?

 

Good communication with the patient is something that I find that most dentists struggle with. I would suggest building up rapport with senior clinicians at work, a mentor through an organisation or with the specialists that you refer to and ask them lots of questions on how they would communicate with their patients in different scenarios and learn from their experiences.

The first aspect is communication of case difficulty with the patient. It is a good idea to clarify to the patient at the consultation visit if his/her case is simple or complex to manage. And if the case is complex, then go through with the patient what makes the treatment of their tooth/teeth complex and to provide an option of seeing an endodontist.

Second aspect is communication of complications and risks to the patient and reading the patient well enough before starting treatment. For example, when you discuss the risk of instrument fracture to the patient, have you discussed through what you plan to do if that occurs, so that the patient is prepared that he/she may require further management with a specialist afterwards?

We do manage patients with differing expectations, and it is good to understand what the patients expect before starting. For example, if I am going to discuss endodontic treatment of a tooth with poor prognosis, I often put the question back to the patient and ask, “how would you feel if this tooth would require extraction and replacement within five years?”. It gives me a clearer idea of what the patient expects me to achieve and if he/she would be disappointed if treatment does not work out in the short term.

At times, it can be useful getting the patient to sign an acknowledgement form, if he/she definitely wishes to proceed with treatment regardless of the poor prognosis of the tooth, just so that there is another level of acknowledgement and to make sure that the patient is on board with you regarding the potential short term survival of the tooth, before proceeding.

 

Magnification is an important tool in successful endodontic treatment. What other tools do endodontists use on a day to day basis that general dentists can benefit from using?

 

I definitely think it is a good idea to get a tool for transillumination to detect cracks in teeth in a clinic, such as the microlux 2 transilluminator. A lot of dentists find it hard to confirm the finding of cracked them then end up placing metal bands around cracked teeth as a result. However, there are a lot of issues with placement of metal bands. With transillumination and high magnification with a microscope, it definitely helps in confirming the location and extension of the cracks, so we can inform the patient promptly regarding the treatment options and prognoses without delay.

 

Second tool that I enjoy using is definitely the electronic apex locator. I hope all dentists learn how to use one well because it does help with determination of the working lengths besides relying on the radiographs. If you are uncertain about using one, definitely contact your endodontist and consider observing him/her using it.

 

Thirdly, I like using the WAM key crown remover. It does make removal of crowns much more efficient and could be a useful tool in have in the clinic.

 

Letter From the Editor: September 2020

Letter From the Editor

Looking Ahead

As we enter the last quarter of 2020 it’s time to start looking ahead. Within the new normal, dental practices, CPD organisers and dentists are all working in creative and impressive ways to excel. At CPD Junkie we have been pushing ahead as well. We have launched our new fresh website with added functionality and an improved interface to make finding CPD easier than ever. We have been bringing on new partners and starting collaborations to finish 2020 strong.

If you are new to CPD Junkie, be sure to check out the website and spend time exploring all the CPD available. Start planning to finish 2020 strong and look ahead to 2021 with a concrete plan for how you want to spend your time and money investing in yourself.

Dr. Omid Azami

Co-Founder CPD Junkie

 

Blog Post: September 2020

CPD Junkie Blog

“Everyone has different levels or experience and natural ability. When you are out on a run you may run past some people and this can make you feel great about yourself and how fast and fit you are. Similarly, there will be times when you are running and people fly past you and this can make you feel slow, unfit or take away motivation. That is why it is important to run your own race.”

Dr. Omid Azami

Co-Founder CPD JunkierHost of Noobie Dentist Podcast
www.noobiedentist.com

Expert Q&A – September 2020

Expert Q&A with: Dr. David Attia

BDSc (Griffith), GradDip (Dent)(Griffith)), MSc (Oral Implantology)(Goethe) PGDipClin(Ortho)(CoL), FICOI

David Attia Headshot

“when it comes to oral surgery and implant dentistry, I believe it’s important to crawl before we can walk, and walk before we start to run. Beginning with fundamentals such as treatment planning, case selection and the importance of medical history for example, will provide us with a solid foundation on which we can truly develop our skills and build our experience and confidence levels. Having a good grasp of the basics allows us to discover and acknowledge our limitations and therefore lead, to good case selection”

Dr. David Attia

Bio:

Dr David Attia completed his undergraduate training at Griffith University, Queensland. Following graduation, Dr. Attia completed a Post Graduate Diploma in Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics through the City of London Dental School and is now a clinical instructor for dentists completing the program through EODO, Australia.

His passion for surgery led him to complete a Master’s in Oral Implantology through Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany. David’s Master’s dissertation focused on a novel approach in full-arch implant rehabilitations and he presented his research at the 6th Annual Congress of Innovation Jumps in Oral Implantology. Dr. Attia has also presented on the importance of dental photography and clinical documentation, as well as the soft tissue management around implants both locally and abroad. David is also involved in live surgical training of dentists looking to begin their journey in dental implantology.

Among others, he is an active member of the Australian Society of Implant Dentistry (ASID), The International Team for Implantology (ITI), the International Congress of Oral Implantologists (ICOI), and has completed his fellowship with the ICOI.

Dr Attia thoroughly enjoys the multi-disciplinary approach to dentistry. David’s unique combination of education and training allows him to implement cutting-edge treatment, offering patients comprehensive, predictable and long-term treatment solutions.

 

Oral surgery and implant dentistry is a big aspect of dentistry that a lot of dentists want to learn more about. From case selection, flap designs, extractions and implants, how do you suggest people get started in safely expanding their clinical scope?

 

I’d like to start with a quote from one of my mentors – “The knowledge of today can be the error of tomorrow”

In all aspects of clinical (and non-clinical) dentistry, continuing education is essential and should form an integral part of your schedule when planning the year ahead. Whether you want to open your eyes to an aspect of dentistry you don’t know much about, or completely immerse yourself into something you are truly passionate about, ‘ongoing education’ will always be key….and education comes in many different forms. We are very blessed to be practicing dentistry during an era where education is so readily available – not only live, but also online.

However, in my opinion, when it comes to oral surgery and implant dentistry, I believe it’s important to crawl before we can walk, and walk before we start to run. Beginning with fundamentals such as treatment planning, case selection and the importance of medical history for example, will provide us with a solid foundation on which we can truly develop our skills and build our experience and confidence levels. Having a good grasp of the basics allows us to discover and acknowledge our limitations and therefore lead, to good case selection – especially during the early stages of our journey where mistakes and complications can often stunt our growth and deter us from taking on cases.

There are so many great courses run by phenomenal educators out there – from short weekend courses to modular-style mini-residency programs – there is just so much to choose from. Although these courses offer great value in their own regard, I am a big advocate for structured, blended learning programs through recognised tertiary institutions provided by highly respected clinicians within their field. In my personal experience, these programs offer a solid literature-based foundation, coupled with hands-on clinical exercises and a variety of clinical case requirements that are completed under the close supervision of experienced mentors.

In addition to great education, the importance of mentorship cannot be overstated. Surround yourself with mentors whom you trust and have aligned philosophies with. A good mentor will be someone who will not only guide you and help you prepare for cases, but will also be honest in their critical appraisal of your work with the sole motive of helping you improve. This will lead to a greater appreciation for the finer details that can often be overlooked when we begin to venture out into more clinically demanding, multi-disciplinary cases.

 

The say you are average of the five people you hang out with the most. There seems to be a huge movement of top young clinicians in Australia that you are a part of. How much of your personal growth as a clinician do you attribute to the growth of your peer group? How do you suggest other clinicians surround themselves with more like minded clinicians?

 

Personal growth is the result of a number of factors that synergistically work together within each individual. We each have an inherent desire to continue to develop and progress both personally and professionally. However, one cannot overlook the impact that the environment we are in, or the people whom we chose to surround ourselves with have on our trajectory.

Dentistry can be quite an isolating profession and this can be clinically and mentally taxing – particularly when we find ourselves stagnating. Going through these ruts alone can be extremely difficult – especially early on in our careers. Whether we are adapting to a new work environment, struggling to fulfill financial obligations, striving to meet clinical demands, or managing the pressure we so readily place on ourselves to continually improve – we all need help!

The people we chose to align ourselves with can directly influence our mindset. We always have a choice and can either surround ourselves with like-minded individuals and therefore “as iron sharpens iron, so one person will sharpen another”, or we find ourselves surrounded by negativity and the “bad company will corrupt our good character”.

By aligning ourselves with those who want what’s best for us, we create a close net group of colleagues (friends!) who are genuinely interested in our growth and wellbeing as much as they are interested in their own. What does that mean or look like? It means associating with those who will not only share in your successes – but will do so without any shred of jealousy, hatred or envy. It also means that when you experience less-than-ideal results, complications, or even failures, that same group of friends will not shy away from providing the honest feedback and tough-to-swallow pills that you need in order to improve. There is no sugar-coating and no holding back – because you know it comes from a good place.

As we see each other elevate both clinically and personally on a regular basis, our natural response becomes to lift our standards both individually and collectively. We are each on our own journey and carry our own experiences, possessing different strengths and weaknesses. We each have two eyes and two hands, and we will always look at our own work in a different light to others. The more time we spend analysing the good and critiquing the not-so-good in each other’s work, the quicker we begin to assess and plan our cases from a completely different dimension and our eyes will begin see what our minds can now comprehend. It is all about collegiality and being genuinely happy for the individual and collective growth of those around you.

 

You have used social media and Instagram in particular to build a following, connect and collaborate with dentists and specialists from around the world. How can dentists leverage the power of social media to accelerate their learning?

 

Over the last few years, social media has had a huge impact on the dental industry. Facebook, and more recently Instagram have both served as great platforms for clinicians to not only market themselves but to also share their work and connect with like-minded professionals. Great clinicians from all over the world are regularly sharing an incredibly high calibre of dentistry that it is readily accessible at our fingertips. As we connect with dentists and specialists through their clinical work, we also gain an insight into their personal journeys and unique experiences that have shaped them into the clinicians they are today.

This has allowed me to personally form friendships with many general practitioners and dental specialists from different corners of the globe that would have not been possible without Instagram. It is through these friendships that we have been able to learn from one another through case discussion as well as grow and develop not only as clinicians, but also as people. Such interactions have opened up my eyes to a world of dentistry that I had never thought would be possible. It introduced us to new concepts, ideas and philosophies in both clinical and non-clinical dentistry and encourages us to think outside the box in the way we run our practices and complete cases, all for the ultimate betterment of our patient. 

The fact that there is so much positivity on social media at the moment is a great thing, as historically, social media developed a stereotype of negativity and bullying. Nonetheless, despite the many positives that can be drawn out from the power of social media, it is equally important to recognise that it can also serve as a double-edged sword – especially for younger clinicians. As we see the standard of dentistry elevate through the work being put on display daily, it can leave us with a sense of overwhelming pressure as we reflect on our own work. Oftentimes, we are left to ponder “will I ever be able to provide these outcomes for my patients?”. However, it is important to remember that what we see on Instagram is a not only a small snapshot of a particular case, but also the author’s journey, and there is often a lot of blood, sweat and tears shed behind the scenes.

Furthermore, in order to ‘keep up’, ‘remain active’ and ‘engaging’, clinicians can be tempted to shift from striving to achieve patient-centred outcomes, to obtaining that perfect photo ‘for the gram’.  However, social media should be aspirational. It should serve as a source of inspiration to helps us discover our passions. We ought to look at the incredible clinicians that post phenomenal work and rather than think “why isn’t my work that good?”, have the mindset of “how can I fulfill my own potential with the skills I have been blessed with?”.

Social media is a great tool and it doesn’t need to change. Alternatively, we should develop a sound mentality of how we perceive social media. For younger clinicians – seek out and connect with those who are not only more experienced than you, but also people who align with your values. Social media is not for us to ‘learn dentistry’ so-to-speak, but rather point us in the right direction to get the education that we thirst for, and we should look beyond social media for mentors. Remember to stay in your lane, run your own race and compare yourself to who you were yesterday, not who somebody else is today.

For those with more experience, be ready and available to help the new generation of dentists. Be willing to share your experiences with them and wherever possible, offer them sound advice or point them in the direction where they can find solutions to their unanswered questions. Just as we were offered help during the earlier years of our careers (and now as older clinicians!), we too should help those who are to come after us. We owe it to ourselves, our patients and to our profession!

 

 

Speaker Spotlight: September 2020

Speaker Spotlight: Dr. Padma Gadiyar

Dr. padma headshot

 There is never going to be a perfect time to start. Be passionate and add value first. Execution is the key.

Dr. Padma Gadiyar

Bio:

Dr. Padma Gadiyar is a dentist, practice owner, Artificial Intelligence enthusiast, founder Smilo.ai & healthcare consultant to the dental & medical industries. An experienced clinician, Dr. Gadiyar launched her first dental practice in Australia 9 years ago . Author of Buy, Build, Sell-A step by step guide to a multimillion dollar practice empire, Dr. Gadiyar has been seen in Business Insider, Yahoo Finance, Digital Journal, The Times, International Business Times, ABC , BITE magazine & more. An advocate for bringing entrepreneurship & technology into dentistry, driven by a desire for practice owners to create a business supporting both for dentists and their patients using Artificial Intelligence and Remote Monitoring.

I graduate in 2007 from India and finished my ADC exams in 2011. My special interests as a clinician in restorative and cosmetic dentistry. I am trained in clear aligners, smile makeovers, implants, lasers and facial injectables. But my real passion is the BUSINESS PART OF DENTISTRY. I have attended numerous courses on communication, business, digital marketing HR and financial management courses within and outside of dental industry. I speak on topics such as:

  • Rapid Practice Portfolio Management- Entry and Exit Planning
  • Utilising Artificial Intelligence to transform dental practices and patient engagement
  • Innovation-how to create & implement disruptive strategy, technology and ways of delivering care

What made you interested in teaching and becoming a lecturer in your given area of interest?

I believe in adding and keeping everything simple whether its clinical practice or business ownership and making them profitable, enjoyable and scalable. I help clinicians maximise their productivity and generate the best outcome to their entry and exit strategy.

From a lecturer’s perspective, what can CPD Junkies do to get more out of CPD events they attend?

Make a CPD Portal for individual user to keep their CPD attendance certificates, monitor points and send alerts.

Make Virtual running of events and promotions easier and hassle free for presenters

What advice do you have for anyone hoping to become a speaker/lecturer?

 There is never going to be a perfect time to start. Be passionate and add value first. Execution is the key.

Letter From the Editor: July 2020

Letter From the Editor

An Update on CPD Junkie

2020 has been a challenging year for all of us. The dental profession and community has had to be strong, adaptable and creative in overcoming the various challenges thrown at it. At CPD Junkie we have been working to continue to build our brand and to provide value for our members. Through the How to Get the Most of CPD E-Book (https://www.cpdjunkie.com.au/e-book) and the CPD Junkie X Szabi Hant Photography cheat sheet (https://www.cpdjunkie.com.au/photography) we have been doing our part to contribute. The CPD Junk community is continuing to grow and we are excited to be the go to source for Dental CPD as we emerge from the COVID pandemic and CPD events begin to start up again.

Over the past month we have been working very hard on the inaugural CPD Junkie Industry report. Our aim with this report is to provide insight on the state of Dental CPD in Australia/NZ. So keep an eye out for the industry report over the coming weeks and enjoy our monthly newsletter!

Omid Azami DDS, Co-Founder CPD Junkie

 

Blog Post: July 2020

CPD Junkie Blog

"If you walk the same path day after day in a field, a track will form – this is a habit. To break this habit or to form a new one requires you walking a different path and sticking to that path day after day. Change is not quick, and change is not permanent, so persistence and valuing change will be the key."

Dr. Omid Azami

Speaker Spotlight: July 2020

Speaker Spotlight: Dr. Anthony Mak

“In our career, there probably isn’t going to be many opportunities or a long period in your career that people will take time out just to come to listen and learn from you, so if the opportunity arises and you are invited, you should take it”

Dr. Anthony Mak

Bio:

Dr Anthony Mak graduated with multiple awards from the University of Sydney in 2002. He then went on to complete his Post Graduate Diploma in Clinical Dentistry (Oral Implants). Dr Mak is one of Australia’s most sought after speakers, especially in the field of digital and restorative dentistry. He has lectured extensively in Australia, New Zealand and across Asia; and his hands-on workshops have gained such popularity that they are almost always booked out soon after registrations open. He is also gaining great popularity on the European and US circuit. Anthony is the author of two compelling compendiums detailing direct composite and indirect ceramic restorations, the clinical photography and documentations can only be described as exceptional. He has published numerous case studies and articles for local and international dental bodies and associations. Anthony’s interest lies in dental technologies, advances in materials and techniques; and he has a unique understanding of CAD-CAM digital dentistry. Anthony runs two practices in metropolitan Sydney, focusing on quality modern comprehensive care, including aesthetic and implant dentistry. He is also a clinical consultant and key opinion leader for several global dental companies focusing on development of new dental technologies. Outside of clinical practice, Anthony also sits on the Restorative Advisory Board for GC Europe, the Executive planning committee for the Graduate Diploma in Implant Dentistry (Syd Uni), an executive committee member for the Dental Alumni of the University of Sydney, and is the team leader in Australia for the renown BioEmulation Group, a global group of high achieving dental practitioners.

 

What made you interested in teaching and becoming a lecturer in your given area of interest?

I fell into the teaching space about 10 years ago. I had great mentors who were, and still are renowned lecturers in our community right now.  When I started my own practice, I was able to meet with some of these dental companies and from there… it’s history. I first started speaking on diode lasers and then moved onto composites with the ADANSW. I just took it one step at a time and when I was asked to teach, I tried to take the opportunity. I was once advised by a colleague that… “In our career, there probably isn’t going to be many opportunities or a long period in your career that people will take time out just to come to listen and learn from you… so if the opportunity arises and you are invited… you should take it”… and that advice has stayed with me 10 years later. Who knows when this journey will end…so I take it day by day and try to concentrate on my patients and my practice. As at the end of the day, I’m a clinician and I love what I do in practice and anything outside of that, I tackle with a careful stride.

 

From a lecturer’s perspective, what can CPD Junkies do to get more out of CPD events they attend?

I think there are a lot of CPD events currently available. And this is great as only a few years ago this was completely different. I think young dentists should plan their CPD journey from when they graduate to when they become a bit more experienced. Try to focus on topics that are most useful early on in your private practice careers. As you mature as a clinician, you can attend some of the more advanced programs.

 

What advice do you have for anyone hoping to become a speaker/lecturer?

I think just like we learn dentistry from our mentors when we start in private practice, if you are interested in teaching and lecturing then you should try and learn from those who already do it. Try and connect with and learn from those mentors that have been lecturing of speaking for many years in this space. They will be able to guide you and to provide feedback on what you need to do to become successful.

Letter From the Editor: June 2020

Letter From the Editor

A Return to Normalcy

Omid Azami DDS, Co-Founder CPD Junkie

With the easing of restrictions and a return to business, for the first time in a few months a group of friends and I went out to our favourite local restaurant. On the surface the experience was at it would have been in a world prior to the COVID pandemic but on reflection it’s amazing how much has changed. We had to “sign in” by scanning a QR code and filling in our details upon entry. The restaurant also did not have physical menus instead relying on their website’s mobile takeaway menu to order and process payments, finally a restaurant in Melbourne that will let you do split bills!

I am amazed at the adaptability and creativity of local small business to operate within the ever changing landscape of restriction, regulations and customer mindsets. Dentists are in a similar situation and practice owners, staff and associate dentists all face these similar challenges of a return to work and have been incredibly creative and adaptive in their approach. 

It is great that we are back in the chair doing what we do best and serving our patients. It will be interesting to see how things evolve over the next few months and what changes are short term vs permanent, a new normal. 

At CPD Junkie we appreciate the support of our members and subscribers during the past few months. With the majority of CPD events being cancelled, postponed and rescheduled, we also had to be creative and provide different services such as our webinar directory and on-line CPD education listings. We have also been improving the site to make sure that we can provide you the best experience possible when it comes time to find your next CPD event. 

Enjoy the June Newsletter and be sure to check back with CPD Junkie often to see the latest offering of CPD available.

Omid Azami DDS

Co-Founder CPD Junkie

 

 

Blog Post: June 2020

CPD Junkie Blog

"Culture is the sum of everyone’s attitudes, beliefs, behaviour, traditions and skills. So culture really belongs to everyone within a team"
Dr. Jesse Green

Be part of a Winning Culture

Written by Dr. Jesse GreenWe hear about the importance of culture all the time. We know we need to inculcate it in our thinking and daily actions but that is only the beginning of a long, tedious, confusing but extremely rewarding journey. It is like losing weight; you know you need to do it for the sake of your health and wellbeing. You know all the buzzwords like cutting down on carbs, sugar, calorie intake. If you let your body guide you through the process, it may give in to temptations? But what if you deprive your body way too much, then it starts retaliating by going in starvation mode. Sound familiar doesn’t it? If you let your team members or colleagues organically build the culture around you then your own goals and core values or those of your company take a backseat. If you take too much control and try forcing culture on others and they don’t want to be on-board with it, it flounders. The bottom line, however, remains that culture is essential; but what is more important is finding the right balance. And that is exactly what we try to look into today.

What is Culture Anyway?

Culture is the sum of everyone’s attitudes, beliefs, behaviour, traditions and skills. So culture really belongs to everyone within a team. So if you take a dental practice, culture doesn’t belong to the owner of the practice, it belongs to everybody that works in and around that practice. It is driven by the feedback from patients too, so obviously it is the sum of everybody working in, and connected to the organisation. 

Seek Fulfilment, Everything Else Will Follow

As practice owners or providers of services to a practice, monetary gains are on top of our minds, which sometimes lead some to make the wrong decisions and put other interests in the backseat. This mind-set can make the work environment toxic to say the least. Research shows that people would rather work in a happy environment with great leadership for less money than in a toxic environment that pays well. And in times of active social media and active review and ratings culture, it is very easy to get the word out if the organisation has a toxic culture. What you should be focusing on is seeking fulfilment. To make sure that your work principles and ethics are not being compromised; to make sure that you and your team members are happily proactive and always opt for organic growth that all the team members are a part of. 

The Know-it-All Approach to Disaster

This mistake can at times be solely responsible for killing the culture of any team.  As providers, managers and team leaders we need to understand that in order to be the smartest person in the room, you need to be the dumbest person in the room. You should be the one asking questions rather than answering them.Allow your team members to speak to you about their expectations and ideas and they’d carry you forward to greater successes all on their own. 

The Culture is Nobody’s to Own

This somehow correlates with the previous point. You need to know that you can neither claim responsibility nor ownership of the culture of your organisation. Too often we see huge banners, posters and pamphlets scattered all around screaming culture in an organizational space. Those are not interesting to look at and neither do they serve any positive purpose. You cannot just set up some ground rules to be followed and expect it to become a culture. Just like most things great and growing, it needs to evolve. You need to constantly keep your team members on board and be proactive in order to develop and maintain a healthy culture. 

Signs of a Good Culture

So how do you know you have a good thing going on? In all fairness, it is not hard to detect. Everyone deserves a grumpy day every now and then, but if your colleagues or team members continuously show up to work without a smile on their faces and a twinkle in their eyes, then know that something isn’t right. And how do you fix it? You openly communicate. Rather than blaming them for not being productive/active/involved enough, you should try to be on their side and ask them how you can make their work more fun and interesting. 

How to Get the Work Done?

‘Sweet talk doesn’t get the work done, Jesse,’ No it most definitely does not! Which is why you need to set the ground rules beforehand. You need to let team members know what is expected of them and hold them responsible for it.Performance management is one of the best methods to ensure everyone’s on track with their responsibilities within an organisation. If the culture, or business productivity for that matter is suffering because someone isn’t doing their job properly or isn’t on-board with the culture of the company, despite warnings and emotional support, then you need to let go of that person before it gets more toxic.

The Last Word

The only way you can ensure a healthy, proactive and result oriented culture where everyone involved happily works towards similar goals is to make sure you continuously work on it from the backseat. Agreed, it is a tricky position to be in and it will take some time before you, your team members and your patients are all on board with it, but it is a process that will generate great rewards. So keep the culture alive and it will keep you in business.

Expert Q&A – June 2020

Expert Q&A with: Dr. Varun Garg

"The most focus in any discipline of dentistry should always be on diagnosis and treatment planning. If we can plan something correctly and our execution is less than ideal, we can still get a functional result but if we start with a wrong plan, even if our execution is 100% failure is inevitable."

Dr. Varun Garg Prosthodontist BDS, DClinDent (Pros) (Melb)

Bio:

Dr Varun Garg is a Melbourne based and trained specialist Prosthodontist. He maintains his specialist practices in Collins Street (Prosthodontic Group) and Tullamarine (Tullamarine Prosthodontics). Dr Garg graduated from the dental school in 2007 and later received his Doctor of Clinical Dentistry in Prosthodontics from The University of Melbourne in 2017. During his postgraduate program he was awarded with the Dr. Steele Award for outstanding clinical skills. He enjoys all aspects of prosthodontics but has a keen interest in aesthetic, reconstructive and implant dentistry. During his postgraduation, he researched the use monolithic zirconia implant crown and studied their fracture resistance under cyclic loading. 

He is actively involved with prosthodontic teaching as a clinical supervisor at The University of Melbourne, other continuous education programs and hands on courses. He currently holds the position of treasurer for the Australian Prosthodontic Society (Vic Branch) and is affiliated with the International Team for Implantology and the Australian Dental Association. 

Outside prosthodontics he enjoys photography, playing cricket and spending time with his wife (Gazal) and three-year-old boy (Amiek).

You are involved in a lot of teaching to dentists and dental students of various levels of clinical experience. What areas of clinical dentistry do you feel that most young dentists should focus on?

 I think dentistry is a speciality in itself and then there are further sub-specialities like Prosthodontics, Periodontics, Orthodontics etc. This makes dentistry a very diverse field hard to master everything. It’s difficult to answer where most young dentist should focus on in dentistry. It depends largely on their personal interest but also the type of work they are exposed to. 

In general, if I was to say the most focus in any discipline of dentistry should always be on diagnosis and treatment planning. If we can plan something correctly and our execution is less than ideal, we can still get a functional result but if we start with a wrong plan, even if our execution is 100% failure is inevitable. 

Adhesive dentistry and more recently biomimetic dentistry have surged in popularity. As a result, more and more reliance is being placed on “the bond” versus the more tried and tested resistance and retention form when it comes to single unit indirect restorations. Do you think this is the future of dentistry or a trend that will stop with perhaps an increase in restorative failures?

Adhesive dentistry for sure has gained popularity in the last few years and it’s for a good reason. I think the biggest advantage of adhesive dentistry is conservation of the remaining tooth structure. With advances in our understanding of bonding, specific protocols and development of newer & stronger ceramics like lithium disilicates, the predictability with our restorations has increased immensely. Dentine bonding for sure has improved, especially with techniques like immediate dentine sealing (IDS) but the golden bond is still to the enamel and for me that is still a major factor that dictates how much I can rely on the bond itself. 

My advice to the young clinicians reading this will be that bonding is technique sensitive but when executed properly does give us a very predictable result. Having said that, if your bonding substrate either with or without IDS is majority on dentine and very less enamel, then plan your restorations to have some resistance and retention form as well. It’s not always a battle between using bonding or resistance/retention form but rather a subtle balance between the two to achieve an optimal long-term result for our patient. I do feel that the bond-o-dontics is here to stay but we sure will learn from our failure and make changes to our protocols as necessary. 

Occlusion is a big topic that can be hard to understand and implement into daily practice. What is your advice for clinicians seeking to learn more about occlusion and how they can implement it into daily practice?

Occlusion for over a century has been a topic of confusion and anxiety for dental professions. This is because occlusion is not an exact science and there is no conclusive evidence to support superiority of one occlusal scheme over the other, so we need to understand them all and apply the most appropriate scheme dependent upon the patient requirements. One of my mentors once told me “when it comes to occlusion many times things work not because of what we do but despite of what we do.” This is true but also is a very generalized statement. I do think understanding of occlusion is important when we plan either direct or indirect restorations. Occlusion is not hard to understand/implement when we are doing confirmative dentistry like a single crown with intact neighbouring teeth but becomes a lot more critical when doing re-organisational dentistry like in patients with extensive wear or needing a full mouth rehabilitation. These are the patient that do not have forgiving occlusion and as failures in dentistry are expensive can be stressful to deal with. 

If clinicians are planning to treat patients with complex occlusal wear or rehabilitation needs, make sure you firstly know how to diagnose their wear patterns and only then you can design a new occlusal scheme that can account for the patient habits that destroyed their own dentition to begin with. Talk to your mentors, take their guidance, attend continuous education programs with people who have a deeper understanding of this subject and then practice over and over, as that the only way to succeed. 

What advice do you have for dentists thinking about pursuing prosthodontics as a specialty?

 Of course, you are going to get a very biased answer for this question, but I also have to tell you what I honestly feel. Prosthodontics is the best thing that has happened to me. I have always been intrigued by prosthodontics even when I was a dental student and this fascination with the subject has only grown with time. I think prosthodontics is the most rapidly changing field and the advances we have made in the past few years have been phenomenal. It is really exciting time to be a prosthodontist. In the past prosthodontists have been accused of being too invasive with their treatment but that has totally changed now. Prosthodontist now have a very different view and approach to treatment planning.

Prosthodontics is the forefront of aesthetics, implants and reconstructive dentistry and it is only getting better. Each day in the office is different than the last and that is exciting for me. I won’t say that being a prosthodontist is easy or not challenging as we are dealing with quite complex situations most of the times, but it is equally rewarding as well. 

For anyone who is planning to pursue prosthodontics, I would encourage them to do so. Keep that fire burning within yourself, “Stay hungry, Stay foolish!”

 

Speaker Spotlight: June 2020

Speaker Spotlight: Dr. Misagh Habibi

Don’t get fooled by short industry driven programs that purport to make you equipped to be a “master” of some aspect of dentistry. Attend more, learn more, and keep learning until you realise how much you have to learn!

Dr. Misagh Habibi​

Bio:

I finished Dentistry at UWA (Perth) in 1999 and started work in private rural practice. Dealing with everything from pros to wisdom teeth to trauma at the hospital, I had to learn quickly. I gained early mentored experience in minor oral surgery. I went onto a Grad Dip in Sedation at Sydney Uni, and sedation ended up being a major part of my daily work. I delved into a year of implantology training programs in 2008, and got hooked in that discipline. Since then I’ve focused my continued learning and practice in implants, along the way gaining an MSc (Oral Implantology) and Fellowship and Diplomate status of the ICOI. I currently practice implants and perioplastic/dentoalveolar surgery full time. As a sucker for punishment I’m also undertaking a P/T PhD focusing on a novel biomaterial development.

I teach for 3 organisations: Goethe University Germany for its Master of Oral Implantology program, The Implant Institute which is my initiative in cooperation with other colleagues in Australia, and the Cambridge Academy of Dental Implantology. We deliver a comprehensive PGCert and PGDip (Dent Imp) program (UK Award) to Australian dentists, as well as other training programs.

What made you interested in teaching and becoming a lecturer in your given area of interest?

I’ve always enjoyed teaching, talking shop and sharing skills. I’m passionate about delivering information in a way that the student can understand and become empowered to build further learning on. This stems from a desire to deliver learning in a way that I would want to learn. I find some programs speak so academically that it can be overwhelming to learn anything. At the other extreme, some programs can be naive to the complexity of what they are imparting, giving a false sense of confidence which proves harmful in clinical practice. Many fundamentals can be lost if glossed over, whilst teaching advanced details without learning “the big picture” fundamentals can also have limited outcomes. So I try to marry practical case orientation and science, taking into account pros and cons and complications of various situations.

Another motivation for me is to contribute to an open, encouraging and enjoyable dental community culture: Where we can avoid dogmatic opinions, and move away from petty motivators like competition or ego.

From a lecturer’s perspective, what can CPD Junkies do to get more out of CPD events they attend?

My advice would be that CPD Junkies should focus in on pertinent and valuable CPD opportunities rather than spread their energies too thin. It’s a great idea to keep abreast of developments in all aspects of dentistry, but ultimately you can’t master everything. At least I can’t! That’s why you see every great clinician has honed in on one or two areas of clinical practice.

In early years after graduation, it’s great to learn tips from all types of seminars and courses. But as you develop further, as there are only so many hours available in our busy professional lives, you have to pick one or two areas to try and learn in depth, and keep learning.

Don’t get fooled by short industry driven programs that purport to make you equipped to be a “master” of some aspect of dentistry. Attend more, learn more, and keep learning until you realise how much you have to learn!

What advice do you have for anyone hoping to become a speaker/lecturer?

If you have a passion for teaching that you’d like to contribute to the profession, focus first on continued learning and clinical experience. Gain postgraduate qualifications or extensive training in a given area, and get lots of clinical experience under your belt, so that your knowledge is also informed by experience. We learn most from our mistakes, but we can also learn from others’ mistakes. It generally takes about 10 years of solid clinical practice in a niche area to do that. It’s important to understand the science and benefits of different clinical methods, even those you don’t practice yourself – otherwise you become a biased educator. It’s also important to remain open to change and developments in the profession. Right now, with a plenitude of webinars and courses, many skilled clinicians almost feel pressured to be in the education game. It may not keep growing this way, as the industry may not sustain it.  Think about what difference you would bring. Align yourself with good organisations, collaborate, and be a refreshing contribution to our profession by keeping your ego in check.

Letter From the Editor: May 2020

Letter From the Editor

United Through Webinars

Omid Azami DDS, Co-Founder CPD Junkie

As we roll through the second month of the Covid-19 Pandemic, so much of our daily lives have changed. With the easing of restrictions back to level 2 and 1, a lot of our colleagues are cautiously returning to work to serve their patients and their dental needs.

One amazing trend to emerge during this period of isolation and social distancing has been the rise in dental webinars. Our nights have been filled with content from speakers from around the world sharing their lectures, cases and lessons to dentists sitting in the comfort on their own living rooms, for free! 

At CPD Junkie we have been working hard over the past few weeks to try and list all the available webinars in one place to make them easier to find and keep track of. We hope that you have made the most of your down time and really taken advantage of these webinars to learn something new. The delivery of CPD may change in response to this Covid Pandemic and our commitment to our CPD Junkie community is to remove as many barriers between you and finding quality CPD. 

Enjoy the second edition of the CPD Junkie Newsletter and be sure to sign up for an account if you haven’t already to receive all the benefits of the website including the free “How to Get the Most out of CPD” E-book. 

 

Expert Q&A: May 2020

Expert Q&A with: Dr Mehrnoosh (Nu) Dastaran OMFS

MBChB BDS MPhil DOHNS (RCS Eng) FRACDS (OMS)

"OMFS is indeed a broad scoped speciality, but it is important to remember that our roots still lie firmly in dentistry."

Dr. Dr Mehrnoosh (Nu) Dastaran

Bio:

Dr. Mehrnoosh (Nu) Dastaran is a Victorian-trained Specialist Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon, who graduated in Medicine in 2005 from the University of Bristol and Dentistry in 2010 from King’s College London, as the highest achieving candidate in both degrees. She has undergone sub-speciality fellowships in craniofacial and skull base surgery, corrective jaw surgery and craniofacial trauma at the Royal Melbourne and King’s College Hospitals. 

Dr. Nu plays an active role in undergraduate and postgraduate surgical and dental education at the University of Melbourne and is a senior lecturer at Charles Sturt University. She has researched collaboratively with the Victorian branch of the Australian Dental Association (eviDent Foundation) and has completed a Master of Philosophy in Dental Science by Research in the field of Implantology at the University of Melbourne Dental School. 

Dr. Nu works as a specialist at The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne, and in private practice in Melbourne and regional Victoria. Her special interests include corrective jaw surgery, craniofacial trauma, dentoalveolar surgery, implantology, minimally invasive salivary gland surgery and facial aesthetics.

In her spare time Dr. Nu finds it hard to sit still. She relishes musicality and movement through dance, and in particular, enjoys classical ballet and pole dancing. She also loves to explore the outdoors, whether on foot or by bicycle.

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is a very broad scoped specialty. What procedure(s) can an OMFS provide patients that referring dentists may not be aware of?

OMFS is indeed a broad scoped speciality, but it is important to remember that our roots still lie firmly in dentistry. 

We are trained specifically in oral surgery in a way that ensures thorough knowledge of its evidence base, and precision and attention to detail in its execution. Yes, we do place dental implants in the aesthetic zone, for example, and we do perform an array of soft and hard tissue augmentation procedures that can facilitate oral rehabilitation with dental implants. 

Many dentists do not realise that our patients can access Medicare rebates, so surgery is a lot more affordable than it might seem. Additionally, for us, implants, graft materials and some surgical guides like MGuide® fall under the prosthesis list, which means that patients often do not have to pay for them. I see this as a huge bonus, particularly as we are in the business of helping people!

Many oral and maxillofacial surgeons have additional/subspecialty interests in cancer surgery, free flap reconstruction or paediatric cleft and craniofacial surgery. My love of facial anatomy and strong background in orthognathic surgery has grown my interest in facial cosmetic surgery.

Whatever the area, it is clear that the fine motor skills, creativity and 3-dimensional perspective required for dentistry, have given us an advantage over other surgical specialties. 

A lot of dentists may not have well developed working relationships with their specialists. From your experience, how can a dentist establish a better working relationship with their specialists?

I believe in relationships that are personal, mutually beneficial, respectful, and long-term. I am a proponent of good and open communication, whether in person, over the phone or in writing. Personally, I respond best to face-to-face meetings and phone calls, because I like to put a face and/or voice to someone’s name. That is my practice style.

It works both ways though. Sometimes, specialists may seem unapproachable, and for me, sometimes, it is difficult to get beyond a receptionist when I am trying to contact a dentist or potential referrer.

So, send an email to your local specialist, and ask for a coffee date, or time for a catchup. Discuss complex cases in person or virtually (technology and Covid-19 have helped to expedite this), so that you can nut-out a treatment plan when you have all the information in one place and at your fingertips. And, importantly, if you are sending a potentially difficult referral their way, forewarn them so that they have time to prepare!

You have been involved in a lot of teaching lately.  When it comes to dentoalveolar surgery, what 3 practical tips do you have for dentists to perform extractions safer and more predictably? 

  1. Have the right equipment open and ready. For this, you need to plan for all eventualities. That way you will not have to stop-start, because it can be stressful trying to find equipment during a procedure.
  2. Communicate with your nurse. Active assistance is invaluable. This includes teaching them how to support the head, support the jaw, retract the tongue and adjust the light if it is not on target etc. without you having to ask.
  3. If you can get forceps on a tooth, always deliver it with forceps and do not be tempted to complete the extraction with an elevator. This will avoid complications like root fractures, and tuberosity and cortical plate fracture. Push, never pull.

What advice do you have for any dentists thinking of specialising in OMFS? How do you see the future relationship between dentists and specialists evolving?

If you want to specialise in oral and maxillofacial surgery, get both degrees (medicine and dentistry) completed and out of the way as soon as possible. There are no prizes for taking a lifetime to become eligible to apply for training. Generally, to specialise, you need to do things that make you stand out from others and excel, like research and work experience. 

Do not underestimate the value of general dentistry, however. There is also so much quality CPD available to general dentists now, that you can focus your attention on a few areas of interest without having to specialise.

It is important, nevertheless, to know your limitations, be able to manage your complications, and to establish relationships with specialists around you. I think that as dentistry advances, specialists and general dentists will increasingly lean on each other. Ultimately, we must not lose sight of our common goal, which is to provide the safest and best level of care for our patients. 

 

Blog Post: May 2020

CPD Junkie Blog

"Many a times, people stop themselves from making big decisions because they are unsure/scared/financially weak yet unhappy. They continue to lead those unfulfilling lives rather than take action to do things differently. The moment you decide not to do something about your current situation, you’ve made a decision there and then!"

Dr. Jesse Green

Speaker Spotlight: May 2020

Speaker Spotlight: Dr. Sam Koh

"Find the courses that excite you and interest you, so then when you’re there you’ll be truly excited and willing to learn."

Dr. Sam Koh

Bio:

I graduated from the University of Melbourne in 2011 with First Class Honours in Bachelor of Dental Sciences. Since, then, I’ve completed the Progressive Orthodontic Seminars (POS) 2-year orthodontic program as well as several other shorter format courses in various disciplines. My area of interest and passion lies in the multidisciplinary approach to aesthetic dentistry and smile rehabilitation. I also enjoy all aspects as orthodontics – both fixed and clear aligner therapy. I run a group called the Young Dentist Hub, which offers quality CPD to younger clinicians at affordable prices, and also lecture on topics such as resin composites and clear aligners.

What made you interested in teaching and becoming a lecturer in your given area of interest?

It was actually all a bit of a lucky coincidence as to how it all unfolded. Back in 2015, me and a good friend decided we were fed up of the lack of affordable courses for younger dentists, especially from the bigger companies and organisations. We threw our first Young Dentist Hub conference, and the rest is history! There are so many amazing course providers out there now dedicating events to younger dentists and I really hope we played a huge part in making that all happen. In terms of lecturing, well that all came pretty spontaneously and naturally as I never even imagined I would ever do something like teaching and speaking to other clinicians and lecture internationally! I think people and companies could just see how enthusiastic and passionate I was to teach others, as I feel the way I present topics is relatable to the common clinician. I’ve been told the way I present topics is practical, simple and easy to understand, which I think a lot of dentists hopefully enjoy.

From a lecturer’s perspective, what can CPD Junkies do to get more out of CPD events they attend?

I think you should really consider beforehand what disciplines or topics you want to delve deeper into to continue your ongoing journey. Find the courses that excite you and interest you, so then when you’re there you’ll be truly excited and willing to learn. Actively seek out clinicians that you want to hear and learn from, those whose work you admire and respect, and those that their way of teaching resonates with you. Once you’re at the event – don’t just be a passenger. Instead, make sure you go prepared to take notes and are curious to ask questions and participate. I’ve always found that the ones who take away the most from courses are those who are active and ask lots of questions. We’re all here to learn and there’s no shame in putting a hand up and asking a question if it means you can consolidate your learning.

What advice do you have for anyone hoping to become a speaker/lecturer?

Run your own race. I never reached out for anything or anyone, and I think companies and organisations really see and understand that. I personally don’t think you should ever actively approach someone or try to force their hand to get them to have you lecture or speak. Otherwise, when you start lecturing, people can see right through you as the person who is just there for pure publicity or is egocentric and your speaking career will be over before you know it as that will surely come across in the way you present too. Instead, put your head down, plug away and do quality work, continue to network and become the best clinician you can be and opportunities will surely come your way.  You do you Boo.

 

Blog Post

CPD Junkie Blog

"The moments you feel some sort of excuse or avoidance you need to lean on and confront it. Because when you are trying to avoid something, you start making excuses or start justifying why you aren’t doing it"

Dr. Jesse Green

How to Bounce Back from a Setback

By: Dr. Jesse Green

We all have setbacks; it is part of living on this beautiful planet. Listen to anyone’s success story and they’d tell you about how they moved forward against the odds; how they fought back against forces to be where they are. And it all sounds inspirational, amazing and impossible to achieve!

Thomas Edison may have done 1800 experiments before inventing the light bulb, I don’t think I have that kind of willpower’. But how do you know you don’t? Resilience is one word that is often misrepresented. And resilience is one trait, which when achieved can make all the difference in how you approach work, life and more importantly setbacks in general.

The True Definition of Resilience

So what is the true definition of resilience?

Letter From the Editor

Letter From the Editor

The Importance of Community in Times of Crisis

Omid Azami DDS, Co-Founder CPD Junkie

We are all feeling the ripples of this COVID-19 global pandemic. Our personal, social and professional lives have come to halt and we are all dealing with the far stretching consequences. The next few months will be challenging for all of us and we at CPD Junkie hope to be there to help as much as we can.

We hope this monthly newsletter will provide you with some high quality content from some of the leaders in Dentistry from Australia and abroad. Our is to make newsletter education and filled with value for our CPD Junkie community.

Thanks to technology, isolation should not mean isolated. Stay connected with your dental community and peers via social media and video conferencing apps such as Skype, Zoom and FaceTime. Use your downtime to catch up with friends and family, exercise and start those projects you have been thinking about and just never really got around to.

Educate yourself. No better time than now with so many online resources available. CPD Junkie has started listing online CPD and webinars to its directory, have a browse and get learning.

 

Expert Q&A

Expert Q&A with: Dr. Bruce Freeman

"Parts of our toolbox of life-skills needs to be the ability to receive feedback fearlessly"

Dr. Bruce Freeman

Bio:

Dr. Bruce Freeman is a native of Toronto. He is an honours graduate of the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Toronto where he was recognized with numerous awards for his clinical and academic achievements. He then completed the Advanced Education in General Dentistry program at the Eastman Dental Center in Rochester, New York. Dr. Freeman then returned to the University of Toronto where he received his Diploma in Orthodontics. Subsequent to this he completed his Master’s of Science degree in the field of temporomandibular disorders and orofacial pain.

Dr. Freeman is Co-Director of the Facial Pain Unit within the department of Dentistry at Mount Sinai Hospital where he is responsible for the management of patients with complex facial pain disorders in addition to participating in the education of the hospital dental residents and specialty dental residents from the University of Toronto dental faculty. He also participates in research initiatives within the department which have yielded publications in the European Journal of Neuroscience, Pain, Brain Research and Neuroimage and lectures internationally on the topics of clinical orthodontics, facial pain, patient experience and mindful communication, and virtual surgical planning.

Bruce is a certified yoga instructor with additional training in breathing techniques, meditation, and trauma informed movement. He directs the Wellness Program for Hospital Dental Residents at Mt. Sinai Hospital in Toronto emphasizing how self-care leads to the best patient care.

You lecture throughout North America on the patient experience. What are three simple to implement tips that dentists can implement to improve the experience of their patients?

BF: With patient experience techniques you will often try and say something I may suggest or you hear a colleague say and when you say it the patient they look at you like you have three heads! There needs to be a lot of good ol’ trial and error to see what works for you, particularly in these trying times when both the typical stresses patients have will be compounded by mental fatigue, worry, and financial strain. Three tips you can make your own that will be more critical moving are as follows:

  • Listen to the story patients have to tell and never acknowledge an emotion, such as “I am afraid of having a tooth out”, with a fact, such as “I have done this a thousand times”. Listen and HEAR the patient’s concerns and ask a lot of questions starting with “why”.
  • Draw flow charts about treatment options and have the patient teach back the plan and always ask them if it makes sense to them.
  • Ask if you missed anything that they wanted to discuss and always thank them for letting you look after them. A phrase that will mean so much more in the future.

A lot of young dentists are facing burnout, stress and overall dissatisfaction, with some even seeking alternate careers. What advice do you have for a dentist struggling with these issues in the early part of their career?

BF: These are issues that will become even more prominent as we navigate the “new normal” of dentistry after the significant strain the world must now endure. The toolbox needs to be filled with strategies that bolster resilience. Breathing, movement (yoga, qi gong etc), and a regular meditation practice help people learn to look inward and name their emotions so they can observe the feeling and not be controlled by it. At present we have the time to learn for free from experts in the field and becoming proactive helps mitigate fear and worry as we, like our patients, like to know we have a plan. Mentors are critical in life and it is best to find different ones for both your professional and personal worlds. These things need to be taught early on in school, so they become second nature. There are NO easy answers but ignoring how we feel and not addressing the worry and stresses in our lives will not make them go away.

Imposter syndrome and the Dunning-Kruger Effect are two popular concepts about the struggles we all face in our abilities as clinicians. You work closely with a lot of residents and mentor a lot of dentists. What strategies can we deploy in times of self-doubt to get past this challenge?

BF: “Fake it until you ARE it” is a popular phase but it does ring true. Dunning-Kruger occurs when people lack the insight to realize they are not great at something and look at you oddly when you suggest otherwise (eg: karoke night). Parts of our toolbox of life-skills needs to be the ability to receive feedback fearlessly. The delivery of this feedback may not always be ideal but the kernel of truth still resides in what is said. Dental school can take serious knocks at your self-esteem. It is tricky but we need to focus on providing a positive emotional experience for patients and nudge our ego out of the way and realize we will never be good at everything. Recognizing there are things in dentistry and life “we don’t know we don’t know” is the first step. Take lots of courses but in areas you want to focus and figure out what you can do best to serve your patients as you will never be able to do-it-all with a high-level of skill.

What do you see as the main pros and cons of social media use for dentists?

BF: Wow. We are learning first-hand the power of social medial to be a positive force in bringing people together and sharing information. The world is now united in an unprecedented struggle and knowing we can chat with our friends and colleagues and band together to offer support is incredible. One however, must be mindful of thinking what we see with regard to people’s work and lives is just a snapshot and what they want the world to see. Our brains however react in interesting ways and suddenly we feel inadequate, despite telling ourselves “oh, I know it’s just Instagram” and it’s not reality. We all must be mindful of what we post and how young professionals and students deal with the content. If less than positive profiles don’t have an audience, they will fall into the shadows. Educational and motivational profiles, of which there are many, should be where people focus and we must always remember to communicate professionally and collegially as now, more than ever, we need to lift each other up.

Speaker Spotlight

Speaker Spotlight: Dr. Clarence Tam

"To get the most from CPD events, I feel that one needs to ask questions, and that will come if you engage with the material"

Dr. Clarence Tam

Bio:

I went to the University of Western Ontario for both my undergraduate degree in Honors Microbiology and Immunology (thesis: Site-Directed Mutagenesis of recombinant bone sialoprotein in enamel formation) as well as my Doctor of Dental Surgery.  I completed a General Practice Residency with the University of Toronto and Hospital for Sick Children following graduation.  I attained Accredited status with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry in 2017 and have been working through the Kois Center curriculum.  My area of interest is orofacially-driven smile rehabilitations with interdisciplinary elements, laser-assisted therapeutics as well as naturomimetic direct and indirect restorative procedures that are minimally invasive.

What made you interested in teaching and becoming a lecturer in your given area of interest?

CT: I started by trialing and reviewing certain dental products with the goal of seeing how they could improve both my esthetic and patient function outcomes.  This drove me to study and focus on techniques that optimized bonding microtensile shear bond strengths in conjunction with material features in a goal to try to reproduce the respective layers of missing tooth substrates with minimal failures.  I believe my strength is that I am able to explain and demonstrate something seemingly complex to any person in a simple, efficient, easy-to-relate-to and accessible manner all whilst getting their passion levels pumped up.  I believe that even if you weren’t interested that I could make you not only become interested in the topic but also plant the seed of desire to master it.  I’m an optimist, obviously.

From a lecturer’s perspective, what can CPD junkies do to get more out of CPD events they attend?

CT: To get the most from CPD events, I feel that one needs to ask questions, and that will come if you engage with the material.  I really like how the JCD (Journal of Cosmetic Dentistry) issues are organized, all by theme or topic.  For example, orofacially-driven smile design can encompass multiple areas of white and pink modification and the techniques to achieve them, often with novel combinations.  After you have finished one lecture or topic, actively search out more on the same topic and really delve into it to gain maximal benefit.  Don’t chop and change until you truly exhaust your interest.  For example, if one is speaking about soft tissue augmentation and customized emergence profiles on immediate placement implant provisional crowns, some will focus on a pure digital workflow and what is achievable.  It is similarly important to search out resources on the analog workflow to understand what combination of techniques is possible if something didn’t work out with one or the other.  A blended technique often works well, but it is up to us to know as the bartender “what to blend” to create the drink.

What advice do you have for anyone hoping to become a speaker/lecturer?

CT: I would say that stage fright is often only an early deterrent.  It is true that the more you do, the better you get at it.  It is important not to look to others, or to have preconceived ideas as your ideals.  Instead, desire to express your full personality in conveying your message.  If you’re into avocados, have a lot of avocados on the slides, and use avocado flesh (sorry, flesh is a gross word) as an analogy for how for example very soft caries might feel (sorry, now I’ve tainted your image of avocados).  The bottom line is to find an area of interest and really delve into it.  Everybody has experience that is valuable, experience that they can share.  Being a lecturer stems from how you wish to help others in raising the bar of possibility and outcomes in clinical practice.  Try to generate emotion in the crowd.

 

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